Dead Confederates, A Civil War Era Blog

Texas Military Forces Museum, Camp Mabry, Austin

Posted in Memory by Andy Hall on January 15, 2017

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Assorted images from my recent visit to the Texas Military Forces Museum at Camp Mabry, in Austin. Above, a “Forty and Eight” box car from World War I. Never expected to see one of those in Texas. Full gallery here.

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GeneralStarsGray

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10 Responses

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  1. Barry said, on January 16, 2017 at 10:15 am

    Could swear my Great Uncle Joe said he was at Camp Mabry right after he signed up right before WWII.

  2. Barry said, on January 17, 2017 at 10:02 am

    I have a recording of My great Uncle before he passed. Uncle Joe said he joined the army early because he knew that we would eventually be involved in WWII. He was at Camp Mabry in Texas Army National Guard 36th division company F. He was like a message courier and drove a motorcycle with a sidecar or “motor-sickle” as Uncle Ed would say. He drove the motorcycle to Camp Bowie in the cold rain December 14th 1940.

    • Andy Hall said, on January 17, 2017 at 1:41 pm

      Bill Mauldin, the famous cartoonist, got into the Army in a similar way by joining the Arizona National Guard in 1940. The Guard was soon thereafter rolled into the regular Army, so he had a certain status beyond the soldiers who enlisted after Pearl Harbor. Lots of folks assume he was a sort of war correspondent (i.e., civlian attached to a military unit), but he was an honest-to-goodness soldier who was detached to draw cartoons for Stars and Stripes.

  3. pedrog said, on January 17, 2017 at 11:15 am

    Someone has done a bit of work pulling together information on the Merci Train cars by state:

    http://mercitrain.org/Texas/

  4. bob carey said, on January 22, 2017 at 9:17 am

    My dad joined the Marine Corps before the War, as he would say the Judge gave him a choice between that and being a guest of Albany County for 2 months. As a side note he was also a member of the Forty and Eight of the American Legion and I often wondered where the name originated. Andy, you have answered that question. Thanks.

    • Andy Hall said, on January 22, 2017 at 9:22 am

      The Marines saw some very hard action during the First World War.

  5. Jim Schmidt said, on January 27, 2017 at 8:44 am

    Great post Andy! I had the pleasure of visiting Mabry with my soon-to-be son in law back in 2011…your readers are welcome to see a few more pics from my blog post back then here:

    http://civilwarmed.blogspot.com/2011/03/texas-military-forces-museum-camp-mabry.html

    One of the things I really enjoyed at the museum was the dioramas

    Folks look for another fantastic museum should visit the 45th ID museum in Oklahoma City – it’s fantastic

    Keep up the great work

    Jim

  6. Keith Muchowski said, on February 14, 2017 at 8:09 pm

    Man,that Forty and Eight looks a lot smaller close up than they do in historic photos. I wish I could have seen this exhibit.


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