Dead Confederates, A Civil War Era Blog

Robert E. Lee’s “lack of a core of greatness”

Posted in Memory by Andy Hall on November 14, 2014

In this interview from the Civil War Monitor, well-known Civil War author Glenn LaFantasie further fleshes out his recent cover article from the magazine, “Broken Promise,” in which he argued that in his moment of national and professional crisis, Lee failed to measure up to his own role models, George Washington and his own father, “Lighthorse Harry” Lee.

I’m sure this will cause some heartburn in certain quarters.

Have a great weekend, everybody.

___________

GeneralStarsGray

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4 Responses

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  1. Betty Giragosian said, on November 14, 2014 at 9:25 pm

    So, what else is new? This man tells us nothing that has not been writlten or said before, by others. He is preaching to a certain choir who will believe it all. They will enjoy it. That’s okay, I don’t expect you to tink any differently. I listened to it once, out of curiosity. Nothing new here. Same old ‘stuff,” for want of a better word.

    • Andy Hall said, on November 15, 2014 at 8:48 am

      LaFantasie’s argument was new to me when I read it in the magazine.

  2. jarretr said, on November 16, 2014 at 12:52 pm

    Lee is one of those unique figures in U.S. History: he’ll always be the untouchable “Marble Man” to those with a proclivity for turning ordinary people into holy idols. For the rest of us, though, he’s a fascinating and flawed character, just like most humans, living and dead.

  3. Bob Nelson said, on November 19, 2014 at 4:32 pm

    Interesting stuff, but as has been written above, nothing really new. Did enjoy his analysis comparing REL, who turned his back on the oath he had sworn to the U.S., and Lee’s father, Lighthorse Harry Lee, who opposed Jefferson and Monroe and argued that the United States government was paramount and permanent. Was disappointed that the last half of the video strayed completely away from the original subject matter. I think the whole subject of Lincoln and Grant has been covered better and in greater detail by others.


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