Dead Confederates, A Civil War Era Blog

Dick Dowling Days at Sabine Pass, September 7-8

Posted in Memory by Andy Hall on August 7, 2013

2013 Public Handbill

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14 Responses

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  1. Pat Young said, on August 7, 2013 at 6:59 pm

    Prayer meeting followed by an execution. If church was like that today, I’d go every Sunday!

    • Andy Hall said, on August 7, 2013 at 7:35 pm

      Executions-as-entertainment — which is what this is — are a little too much for me.

      • Jimmy Dick said, on August 8, 2013 at 8:00 am

        Isn’t that what many of the executions were in the past? Crowds would come to see the executions. And here people think that Rome was a bloody excess for its gladiatorial combat. Our American heritage includes executions as public entertainment.

        • Andy Hall said, on August 8, 2013 at 10:49 am

          True enough. Kinda hoped we were past that, though.

          Many years ago I went to a Renaissance festival that had a public hanging as part of the schedule (at 10, 2 and 4!). This was done somewhat like it was in the day, before the “drop,” where the condemned was basically pushed off a stool and allowed to strangle, slowly. Which the actor/performer, wearing a harness, of course, did, with great, gory contortions. What really bothered me, though, was that the performer running the thing picked a little kid — maybe five or six — from the audience “participate” and push the stool out from under the “condemned,” which the kid did to the claps and cheers of the crowd. I wondered then, and still wonder, if that kid left thinking that that was some sort of game.

          • Pat Young said, on August 8, 2013 at 11:19 pm

            It was a simpler time…

          • Edwin Thompson said, on August 9, 2013 at 10:06 am

            Andy – I feel so out of touch with my country. If it is done in the manner you just described, we are not much different from the Taliban Executions in the football stadiums. I guess they could do this respectfully – as a reminder of that time period and our barbarism. But as you described it – it is a little sad.

            • pycarecen said, on August 10, 2013 at 11:11 am

              Bear baiting, anyone?

  2. Jeff Bell said, on August 10, 2013 at 2:09 am

    The military doesn’t do executions anymore: see Ft. Hood

  3. Damian Shiels said, on August 15, 2013 at 2:27 am

    On the topic of Dowling, he is actually one of the very few Irishmen who is commemorated in his home town in Ireland, with a plaque in Tuam, Co. Galway (albeit many people don’t know of its existence). He has a bit of a wild Irishman look going on…http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dick_Dowling_Plaque_Tuam.JPG

    • Tommy Shaughnessy said, on August 17, 2013 at 5:00 am

      We in Tuam are very proud of Dick Dowling and his accomplishments. We wish you the very best in your forthcoming Sesquicentennial.

      Capt Tommy Shaughnessy (Retd).
      54 Reserve Artillery Regiment.

      • Tommy Shaughnessy said, on September 5, 2013 at 5:42 pm

        Photos from Tuam, Co Galway, Ireland, ancestral hometown of Dick Dowling.

        Tuam, until recently, had its very own artillery sub-unit,13th Hy Mor Bty 5th FAR (Reserve).

      • Debbie Marie Eikum said, on September 6, 2013 at 4:01 pm

        Hi! I’m the great great great grandniece of Dick Dowling. I am of course also related to Ann Caraway Ivins who you might know of. She was in Tuam and was crucial in retelling his story as well as hanging the plaque that is to be found on the Town Hall in Tuam. I live in Norway now, so I won’t be going to the Sesquicentennial. But, I am headed to Tuam in November. Perhaps you would be willing to assist me in planning my trip? Sincerely, Debbie Eikum

        • Tommy Shaughnessy said, on September 6, 2013 at 7:10 pm

          Hi Debbie,
          I’m pleased you’ve gotten in contact. Of course I’ll assist you in the planning of your trip. Kind regards, Tommy.


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